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For extra marks, candidates are invited to explain the difference 
between <g> and <g>...



Michael Beddow wrote:

>Right, now we've settled choice's hash, time to cast and interpret a few
>runes....
>
>I think the basic thing to hold on to here is that <c> is meant to contain
>one single abstract character, or something (generally an NCR or a CER) that
>resolves to a single abstract character. How abstract characters map on to
>phonemes is specific to the writing system and language concerned. In a
>Latin-style script, the contents of a <c> may signify only one component of
>a phoneme, in a syllabary it will often (though not always) correspond to a
>phoneme, in an ideographic script that one abstract character will often
>represent a sequence of phonemes.
>
>I can write the Tagalog word for eye(s) in four Latin abstract characters as
>mata, or (if I'm designing some sort of folksy CD cover) in two Tagalog
>abstract characters as U170B U1706. The Tagalog syllabary count matches the
>phoneme count, but the reason why the character or <c> count for the
>syllabary version is two has no essential link with the number of
>represented phonemes: there are always two phonemes in the word, no matter
>how many abstract characters my chosen writing system uses to represent
>them. So if I wanted to use <c> elements, I would need four of them for the
>form mata and only two for the historical script version.
>
>Michael Beddow
>
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