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* On 2006-03-16 18:59:06 +0100 Mark J. Reed wrote:
> One thing that I only became aware of after reading JC Wells' book is
> that there are several sounds I had thought of as foreign, non-English
> sounds, that actually occur in my own everyday variety of English! 
/snip examples/
> 
> Then there's the rampant labialization, palatalization, and
> nasalization!  "Queen" may be /kwin/ phonemically, but it comes out as
> [k_w_hi~J_}].  Holy crap!
> 
> Anyone else had an experience like this?  Maybe if I'd had more than
> one quarter of linguistics in college I would have had this a-ha
> moment in class instead of when I read the book, but it really sort of
> blew me away.

Have you tried recording yourself and making spectrograms (with for
instance Praat <http://www.fon.hum.uva.nl/praat/>)? Amazing what weird
stuff becomes visible that way. Sounds that are voiced when they
shouldn't, weird approximants etc.


t.