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Eldin Raigmore wrote:
> On Sun, 12 Mar 2006 15:04:59 +0100, taliesin the storyteller <taliesin-
> [log in to unmask]> wrote:
[snip]
>>3. Searching for but/however is rather pointless, so is there a
>>  good linguistic term?
> 
> 
> Well, the Latin for "but" is "sed"; how about "sedative"?

They were known as _adversatives_ (or, more fully, 'adversative 
conjunctions') when I was at school. Even now, 50 years later, I find in 
the on-line Merriam-Webster:
the _adversative_ conjunction _but_

Also "sed" is only one of _eight_ Latin words for 'but' (unless _uerum_ 
& _uero_ are considered variants of the same word, then we have only 
seven adversatives):
(a) Conjunctions that are placed first in clause
SED
   Used in particular to show a change in subject or topic; breaking off 
conversation and moving to something different; after negatives, used to 
  limit the negation; also in the construct "non modo"...."sed etiam" 
(and its variants) = 'not only'...'but also'...

AT
   Adding a qualified difference - but yet. May also be used to begin a 
new narrative; to show something wonderful or unexpected. Could also be 
used to show an objection to something already asserted.

ATQUI
   A much stronger adversative than _at_ - but anyhow, nevertheless. "I 
hear what you say, BUT........". Also used with _si_ (if) to mark 
adversative suppositions: atqui si = but if.....

CETERVM
   but for the rest, but yet - moving to another topic

(b) Usually placed second in clause, but sometimes placed first.
TAMEN
   nevertheless, however, for all that. Often combined with other 
adversatives, e.g. sed tame, attamen, uerumtamen.

(c) Conjunctions that are placed second in clause
AVTEM
   but, on the contrary, on the other hand.

VERVM
   "strongly corroborative adversative particle" - but in truth, but 
notwithstanding, BUT

VERO
   but in truth, but in fact.....

-- 
Ray
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