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 I've looked it up, and if you got your information from Trask then he 
seems to only claim that roots (rather than stems) have only one or the 
other of t(s), t(z)... affix harmony is not the general rule (and 
inflectional affixes never show any harmony), although sometimes it does 
occur in fossilized root + affix combinations and/or old compounds. And 
palatals don't take part in the harmony at all...
 So basically, as I said, Basque may have had active harmony at some 
point, but the changes are mostly fossilized now rather than forcing 
changes in things like inflectional affixes (unlike, say, the nasal 
harmony of some Amazonian languages).

>> Basque has sibilant harmony. Sibilants or affricates
>> within the same word must be all apical _(t)s_, all
>> laminal _(t)z_ or all palatal _(t)x_.  Thus Spanish
>> _Franc├ęs_ is borrowed as _Frantses_ rather than
>> **Frantzes.
>
>
> See eg. txistu (flute) for a counterexample. Also sortzen (creating) 
> and other words... I have to admit that roots with mixtures of (t)z 
> and (t)s are not exactly common, but if Basque did have sibilant 
> harmony it's no longer an active process, in the dialects I know at 
> least. Since I know practically nothing of the French dialects, things 
> could be different there...
>
>