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>Way cool..

Thanks.

>How well did it go?

Far too easily.

>Book for the story yet?

Working on it, but life & illness have been intervening.

>How did you come to what it in way of syntax, sounds, and more?

For sounds, I took Eastern Cree as the core, and added a few from Old Norse
which I thought most likely to have been adopted: [@], [QU], [l], [r\]. [@]
is found in Mi'kmaq*, and [l] & [r\] exist in loan words in Western Cree, so
I assumed Eastern Cree could also adopt them. [] occurs in Western Cree,
but often in positions where Eastern & Central Cree have [ts]; I chose [ts]
because I like the sound more, and excluded [] as I didn't want that close
a phonetic pair. I initially considered keeping [sk] and [st], but found I
was pronouncing them [s.k] and [s.t]. I'm considering dropping /jj/ as I
never use it.

Cree has [i:], [i], [o:], [o], so I took the liberty of reassigning [i] &
[o] respectively as [Q] & [I]. I added [E] & [U] for symmetry and to support
[QU] in Old Norse loan words. When I vocalize Miskuts, I tend to use [u]
rather than [U], and have considered dropping the latter.  Most probably, I
should have pared the vowels to [a],[e],[i],[o],[u]. Ah, well, it is, after
all, my conlang.

I stripped away all class & case endings except the Cree locative suffix
/-kk/ (homogenized for animate & inanimate nouns) and the nominalizer /-vin/
I stripped away all person, tense & aspect affixes from verbs (even
Icelandic middle-voice of which I'm fond) except the inanimate-object suffix
/-im/, requiring that context either state or imply these.

IIRC, Cree indicates clauses with the prefix /e-/ on subjunctive verb forms.
This I reduced to /ets/ preceding the clause.

>You sure they was Cree on Vineland, I forget,
>Cree is a .. its own group or one of the others?

As best I could tell, the Skraelings of Vineland would have been most
probably Beothuk, Innus (Montagnais), or *Mi'kmaq. Little is known of the
Beothuk language, thought it is theorized to have been related to Eastern or
Central Cree; and modern Innus & Mi'kmaq map closely as variants of Eastern
Cree. They're all Algonquin languages.