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Andreas Johansson skrev:
> Quoting Benct Philip Jonsson <[log in to unmask]>:
> 
> 
>>Henrik Theiling skrev:
> 
> 
>>>This is a good idea, I think I will adopt this.  (BTW, I
>>>perceive Icelandic long /E/ as [e:E)] for the speakers I
>>>heard.)
>>
>>That's quite possible.  The same type of realization is
>>AFAIK the rule in Faroese and common in Swedish and Norwegian
>>too, e.g. in the speech of yours truly, at least in closed
>>syllables -- I have long /i/ [i:e], long /e/ [e:E] and
>>long /E/ [E:e].  Go figure out the rule! :-)
> 
> 
> Heretic! High long Swedish vowels should have a consonantal offglide!
> 
> In other words, my /i:/ tends to [i:j] or something like that.
> 
>                                                     Andreas
> 
> 

Mine too, in open syllables.  BTW I don't speak Swedish, ever:
I speak Orustebos or Gothenburgish -- at the very extreme
Gothenburgish with Swedified vocabulary and random occurrences
of retroflex consonants...

-- 
/BP 8^)>
--
Benct Philip Jonsson -- melroch at melroch dot se

    "Maybe" is a strange word.  When mum or dad says it
    it means "yes", but when my big brothers say it it
    means "no"!

                            (Philip Jonsson jr, age 7)