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On Wed, 20 Sep 2006 19:44:04 -0700, Donald J. HARLOW <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

>Je 08.16 atm 2006.09.19, Rex MAY skribis
>
>>That uses up the Roman alphabet, eliminating only one real phoneme
>>(h^), and using ts to
>>represent another.  Yes, Eo 'c' can be regarded as a phoneme
>>analagous to 'c^'.  However, so could
>>'ps' be so regarded, as it's an affricate, too.
>
>Hmmm?
>
>I don't think so.
>
>The sound written in English as 'ts' is indeed a single phoneme; it
>requires only one articulation of the mouth to produce it (front, not
>tip of tongue, pressed relatively tightly against front of palate,
>with air being forced through between the two), and it can be held as
>a single sound, just like its close relative 's' (as in
>"Ssssssssssssssnakes on a Plane").
>
>'ps' is two quite separate sounds, requiring two successive
>articulations of the mouth: first an opening of the lips to let air
>explode out ('p') and then the front of the tongue held relatively
>loosely against the front of the palate. You cannot hold 'ps' as
>such; once the plosive 'p' has been pronounced, it's gone, and the
>sound segues into a simple "ssssssssssss".

I see your point, but trying it myself, I find that the tongue is in place
to pronounce the s while I'm articulating the p.  So I do sort of 'hold'
the ps.   But a better example would be 'pfenigo,' presuming the pf
is pronounced as it is in German.  Definitely an affricate.  And 'dzeta',
also.

Anyhow, all that is merely in aid of my point that replacing caro with
tsaro would be no big deal, as I think there's no phonetic difference
unless somebody actually tries to make them sound different.