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Hi,

Henrik Theiling wrote:
> Hi!
> 
> R A Brown writes:
[snip]
>>Typical? Doesn't it rather depend upon whether a language forms
>>head+attribute or attribute+head compounds?
>>...
>  
> By writing 'man-wolf', I meant 'man' modifying 'wolf' in whatever
> order the particular language implements this.

Right - I think saying 'order' in your original statement misled me.

Yep - even the versions I gave with 'wolf' first support the point that 
'wolf' is the head of the phrase and the 'man/human' word is the 
attribute. It does seem that people regarded these creatures as 
essentially wolves trapped for the most part in humanoid form, rather 
than humans who occasionally got transmogrified into wolves.

> And welcome back, Ray! :-)

Thanks  :-)

-- 
Ray
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