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Actual requirements
"Under HAVA, one voting system at each polling place must be
accessible for individuals
with disabilities including offering nonvisual access for the blind
and visually impaired.
Alternative language accessibility is also required under HAVA in
accordance with § 203
of the federal Voting Rights Act of 1965. Pursuant to § 203, States
and political
subdivisions that have over a certain amount of limited English
proficient citizens in a
single language minority group (defined as persons who are American
Indian, Asian
American, Alaska Native, or of Spanish heritage) may not provide
voting materials only
in the English language. A state or political subdivision is subject
to the requirement
where the number of voting age U. S. citizens of limited English
proficiency in a single
language minority group within the jurisdiction:
• is more than 10,000; or
• is more than 5% of all voting age citizens; or
• on an Indian reservation, exceeds 5% of American Indian or Alaska Native
residents of voting age on the reservation; and
• the illiteracy rate of the group is higher than the national illiteracy rate."
Note that the first three conditions are 'or' and the last,
illiteracy, is 'and'. Any state or political subdivision subject to
the requirement only needs to show that the last condition is not so
for their group to be exempt from the requirement.
It is also true that the illiteracy rates are highest for recent
immigrants from Mexico and Central and South America. This is due to
their having the lowest education of all immigrants. Almost half have
not had high school education. However, the majority of immigrants are
not recent and have literacy rates equivalent to the majority and
native population, according to the Census Bureau.
Some people confuse literacy with ability to speak, read and write English.
As if anyone who is not fluent in your conlang is illiterate.
Que Deus te abençoe sempre, e de todas as maneiras,
Paul
On 11/21/06, Ph.D. <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Paul Schleitwiler, FCM wrote:
> >
> >  Ph.D. wrote:
> > > Among other cases, the courts have ruled that
> > > voting districts must make ballots and voting
> > > guides available in language X if at least 25%
> > > of the voters in that district normally speak
> > > language X at home (regardless of their ability
> > > to use English). For some smaller, semi-rural
> > > districts, this represents a significant outlay of
> > > taxpayer money to provide all materials in, for
> > > example, Vietnamese.
> >
> > A quarter of all voters is a significant portion of
> > taxpayers, who pay for such translations.
>
> 25% would be significant. I was going on memory
> here, and that just seemed too high. I did a little
> research, and the number is actually 5%.
>
> --Ph. D.
>