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Steve Rice  wrote:

> And yet proportionately more US Christians are
> fundamentalists than Muslims are fundamentalists
> (terrorists, whatever). All dangerous Christian
> (or Jewish) fundamentalists could be accommodated
> in a fairly small prison; their muslim
> "counterparts" would require a city.

About 15% of global Muslim population have positive
opinion about al-Qaeda. (Down from 25% 2 years ago.)

Nearly all Christian fundamentalists live in the
USA, where they make up one-quarter of the
population.

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source:
http://pewglobal.org/reports/display.php?ReportID=253

Confidence in Osama bin Laden also has fallen in most
Muslim countries in recent years. This is especially
the case in Jordan, where just 24% express at least
some confidence in bin Laden now, compared with 60%
a year ago. A sizable number of Pakistanis (38%)
continue to say they have at least some confidence
in the al Qaeda leader to do the right thing regarding
world affairs, but significantly fewer do so now than
in May 2005 (51%). However, Nigeria's Muslims represent
a conspicuous exception to this trend; 61% of
Nigeria's Muslims say they have at least some
confidence in bin Laden, up from 44% in 2003. 

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source: http://tinyurl.com/y6vfrx (New York Times) 

Defying predictions of widespread disillusionment,
white evangelical and born-again Christians did not
desert Republican Congressional candidates and they
did not stay home, nationwide exit polls show. 

When it came to turnout, white evangelicals and
born-again Christians made up about 24 percent of
those who voted, compared with 23 percent in the
2004 election. And 70 percent of those white
evangelical and born-again Christians voted for
Republican Congressional candidates nationally,
also little changed from the 72 percent who voted
for such candidates in 2004.

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source: http://www.alternet.org/story/36640/

According to the City University of New York Graduate Center's
comprehensive American religious identification survey, the
percentage of Americans who identify as Christians has actually
fallen in recent years, from 86 percent in 1990 to 77 percent in
2001. The survey found that the largest growth, in both absolute
and percentage terms, was among those who don't subscribe to any
religion. Their numbers more than doubled, from 14.3 million in
1990, when they constituted 8 percent of the population, to 29.4
million in 2001, when they made up 14 percent.

"The top three 'gainers' in America's vast religious marketplace
appear to be Evangelical Christians, those describing themselves
as Non-Denominational Christians and those who profess no
religion," the survey found. (The percentage of other religious
minorities remained small, totaling less than 4 percent of the
population).