Print

Print


On Wednesday 03 January 2007 11:35 am, Adam Walker wrote:
> --- andrew <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> > I am pondering on the pronunciation of the
> > rhoticised yod used as a menu
> > gateway.  Perhaps it indicates that this website
> > should be read in a
> > Dallas accent. :)
> >
> > - andrew.
>
> I'm not sure what you're referring to, but Dallas is
> not nearlly so strongly rhotic as regions east or
> west.  

The icon I refer to on the front page of his website has his initials 
combined into one letter, a J with the hook of a lower-case R.  I can't 
recall if it has any special IPA meaning.  To explain my jest, these 
are the same initials of the most famous fictitious character in the 
1980s series, Dallas, The One Who Was Shot, played by Larry Hagman.  
While I did not seriously follow that series I don't recall the actors 
being especially rhotic which may suggest that the oil family the 
Ewings were also recent immigrants to Texas.

> Ft. Worth is much more a part of the Texas 
> dialect continuum than is Dallas.  That's mainly due
> to the fact that exccedingly few residents of Dallas
> county were born here, or rather, very few of their
> families have been here more than a couple of decades.
>  Most Dallasites are from the East or Midwest or
> Mexico.  Ft. Worth has a much higher percentage of
> native Texans.  Dallas is more attractive to
> immigrants both domestic and foreign-born.  So, while
> very strong rhoticity is typical of Texas, you'll find
> a much milder "General American" sort of rhoticity in
> Dallas.  We're odd men out.
>
> Adam the native Dallasite and fifth generation Texan
>
> 11 Ed ingredjandu ad il bedi, videruns al credura simu al Maja, il
> seu marri; ad caderuns ed adoruns sivi, ed abriruns uls sustrus
> tesorus ed eviruns al jura, ul crisu djul Livanunu, ed murra.
>
> Machu 2:11