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Hello Conlangers!

I join a few days ago, after putting it off for a few years :-)

Eugene --

It looks like BIG5 as evidenced by this line in the message header:
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=BIG5; format=flowed

Now back to lurking...

Best,

~ Daniel

On Sat, 2007-01-20 at 08:40 +0800, Eugene Oh wrote:
> There's some problem with the encoding in your message -- the phonetic
> symbols appear as nonsense characters -- what encoding did you use to
> write this? So that I can use the right decoding for it.
> 
> Eugene
> 
> 2007/1/20, Steven Williams <[log in to unmask]>:
> > --- Benct Philip Jonsson <[log in to unmask]> xi豕 le:
> >
> > > <digression> Writing /ly/ and /ny/ as _lyu_ and
> > > _nyu_ would be perfectly possible without other
> > > changes of Pinyin, and would do away with the need
> > > for _邦_.</digression>
> >
> > But then you'd get ambiguity across word boundaries,
> > especially because few people bother to pay attention
> > to spacing in writing Pinyin (because H角nzi, of
> > course, almost never uses spaces).
> >
> > For the sake of example, let's use /sh芋ny迆/
> > [s\an.Hy], 'at the mountain', and /sh芋ni迆/
> > [s\a.nioU], 'kill the cow'. However, these examples
> > are highly contrived (as in, I doubt these phrases are
> > even grammatically correct), and only show up between
> > /n/ and the /iu/ and /yu/ pair anyways.
> >
> > Personally, I think it makes more sense to write the
> > syllables /n邦/ and /l邦/ as /nuu/ and /luu/,
> > respectively. It leads to no major ambiguities in
> > writing, even if you ignore spacing entirely, and it's
> > the usual work-around used in Chinese word-processors
> > (those that use a Pinyin input, anyways).
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > ___________________________________________________________
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> >