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In a message dated 1/29/2007 10:14:09 PM Central Standard Time, 
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> Classification, as in putting words into categories according to their 
> meaning? Good luck! However you end up splitting the categories, there 
> are likely to be some words that can end up in more than one of them. Is 
> "communication" primarily a social activity or in the realm of 
> knowledge? It crosses over into different areas.
> 
Probably most English words have multiple meanings, so asking if 
"communication" is primarily a social activity or in the realm of knowledge simply misses 
the point.  It's in both categories, and probably many more besides.  One of 
the advantages of using a classification system is that the words practically 
define themselves.  The challenge is to then assign a suitable English 
translation.  

> In other cases, like "justice" or "love", you might be dealing with 
> words that have a range of different meanings. Some meanings of 
> "justice" might fit into the general category of "government", while 
> other meanings would be better included in "feelings and emotions". 
> "Love" has a range of meanings that all might fit into a "feelings and 
> emotions" category, but some overlap with other categories such as "family".
> 
> The thing to keep in mind is that if you're starting with English 
> vocabulary out of context, you'll end up with a lot of words that won't 
> fit a radically different semantic system. Translation exercises might 
> be helpful; you have a specific context for the word to be translated, 
> which can help narrow down the meaning.
> 
stevo