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On 03/02/07, Joseph Fatula <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> > [i] is the nearest vowel, but it's not as peripheral as, say, French.
> > From the various cases of [i] and [I] I've heard in different
> > languages (e.g. Icelandic, some German dialects or Kazakh), [i] sounds
> > much more like KIT than [I] does on average. (Actually, in Kazakh, [i]
> > is described as a "long i" and is phonemically /Ij/, but to my ear it
> > is quite clearly a short [i]..)
> Regarding Kazak, are you talking about the I in words like "bir" (one)
> and "siz" (you) written with the same I-character as English, or the
> other one, like in "siyr" (cow) and "it" (dog) written with the Russian
> I (backwards N)?  To me, the one in "bir" seems like a centralized
> version of [I], while the one in "it" seems to be an ordinary cardinal [i].

When I was talking about [i], I was referring to the cyrillic
backwards N character.

-- 
Tristan.