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I was thinking about this very subject yesterday, though not so much
regarding revulsion but a kind of 'bleeding' that can occur in
languages that are too natural looking. On the Interlingua Wikipedia
there's a person that clearly thinks he can get away with an
Interlingua-ish Spanish, but really it's just a weird kind of Spanish.
Maybe the artificial -o, -a, etc. really is the best system for
keeping the language distinct from the unconscious influence that
people bring into a language when they use it.
I've noticed that any 'revulsion' I feel towards a language only
applies when the content is small. With a few example sentences and
nothing else it can look a bit weird, but if I see a thesis or an
entire book written in the language, it seems to command a respect
that goes beyond any initial revulsion. Much in the same way that a
robot that looks 80% like a human would lose its revulsion if it were
impressive enough that it could look at me and say "Look, I know what
you're thinking and I'm aware that I look weird to you, but this is
the best we can manage with today's technology. I hope you don't
mind." That would pretty much drive it all away.