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The following review is from the February issue 
of the magazine "Esperanto", published by UEA. It 
appears on p. 39. I'm translating it into English 
since it relates to the purpose of this list 
(which, for all intents and purposes, is an 
English-language list). The review is by Andreas Kunzli of Switzerland.

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Detlev Blanke: "Interlinguistische Beitrage. Zum 
Wesen und zur Funktion internationaler 
Plansprachen. Pub. Sabine Fiedler. Peter Lang. 
Frankfurt/M., Berlin, Bern, Brưelles, New York, 
Oxford, Wien. 405 p. 21 cm. ISBN 9783631550243. Price: 56,50 euros.

Interlinguistics and Esperantology belong to 
those topics which have no scientific 
"conjuncture" with high prestige. Even worse, 
with a few exceptions, the field is scarcely 
taught in important universities and in 
consequence knows no shining future and 
professional perspectives, at least at the 
current time. To these disciplines there is a 
complete lack of public pressure (though there is 
some interest on the side of the student body), 
but even more the political will to justify their 
introduction into the college teaching plan. 
Ineradicable prejudices abound and hold 
stubbornly against planned languages. 
Professional interlinguists or Esperantologists, 
too, are few in number, and many somewhat 
interested scientists are occupied with 
interlinguistics only on the edge of their 
original field. Solid, modern, current 
introductory textbooks about interlinguistics and 
Esperantology, both in Esperanto and in national 
languages, are a rarity. So the topic is not at 
all popular. One can only regret that neglect, 
because at least many Esperanto speakers and 
Esperantologists consider these fields essential 
to study the international language problem, with 
which interlinguistics is intimately linked. But 
thanks to this volume, which appeared in 2006 
under the somewhat dry title "Interlinguistic 
Contributions - On the Characteristics and 
Functions of International Planned Languages" we 
at last have at our disposal, in German, a book 
with a scientific level which is well suited for 
introductory, informational and overview 
purposes. This is a collection of contributions 
in the field written or edited by Detlev Blanke, 
one of the most brilliant and renowned 
interlinguists; these have, in the past, already 
appeared in some specialist or scientific 
periodicals. Of course, the articles reflect the 
main interests of the author, who as early as the 
time of the DDR was a very vigorous Esperantist 
and Esperantologist-interlinguist, and who today 
presides over the Society for Interlinguistics 
(Gesellschaft fur Interlinguistik), operating out 
of Berlin. The book unifies within itself 14 very 
different contributions, which are divided into 
four main chapters: in the first chapter 
(Interlinguistics and Planned Languages) general 
questions and the ways to literature in the field 
are treated; in the second chapter 
(Scientific-Historical Aspects) there appear 
articles about Wilhelm Ostwald, Eugen Wuster (*) 
and Ernst Beermann; the third chapter treates of 
the lexicology and lexicography of planned 
languages, and the fourth part is dedicated to 
the translation-science aspects of planned 
languages, e.g. with a study of Zamenhof as a 
translator. In an appendix we find the 
bibliography of Blanke's publications from 2001 
to 2005. Very significant is also the fact that 
this book did not appear from an amateur 
publisher but in the internationally renowned 
publishing house Peter Lang, which mainly 
publishes the works of scientists, young or old, 
as well as verious levels of dissertations. In 
fact several other interlinguistic works have 
been able to appear in book form in that 
publishing house (see e.g. Alicja Sakaguchi's 
studies in 1998 and that of Sabine Fiedler on 
phraseology in Esperanto in 1999). Books which 
are produced at Peter Lang are perhaps somewhat 
simply printed and unhappily have a sale price 
that is too high (because of the limited quantity of publication). (**)

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(*) Totally unrelated, but the mention of Wuster 
-- best known for the invention of the ISO, if 
I'm not mistaken -- reminds me that I was advised 
today that a reprint of his translation into 
Esperanto of Chamisso's "Schlemihl" is going to 
be available as of next week ...

(**) Anybody going into a college bookstore to 
start a new semester is aware of this problem. 
Frankly, I think this explanation is a load of 
hogwash. Having been involved with receiving and 
paying for printing of 1,100 copies of Bertil 
Wennergren's "Plena manlibro de Esperanta 
gramatiko", a 700-page hardback book in what 
anyone would consider a limited print run, I know 
_exactly_ how much such things cost, and each 
copy of that book cost ELNA a single digit's 
worth of dollars. Given the size of the book in 
question, and assuming that it's bound (which it 
may not be), the publisher should be paying the 
printer about $5 per copy, or a little under four 
euros. Figuring discounts and a nice profit for 
the publisher, the book should be selling at 
around twelve euros per copy, not almost sixty.


-- Don HARLOW
http://www.webcom.com/~donh/don/don.html
Opinions (in English): http://www.harlows.org/don/opinions/
Esperanto (in English): http://www.harlows.org/don/esperanto/
Literaturo (Esperante): http://donh.best.vwh.net/Esperanto/Literaturo