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2007/4/4, [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>:
> li [MacLeod Dave] mi tulis la
>
> > Um, from a bit of a tangent. Wasn't the original post about
> making a
> > language actually representative of the people that live on a
> > continent? Somebody said that French doesn't really count
> because it's
> > geographically limited, I said it should, brought up human
> migration
> > vs. straight geography, stated that Haitian people would
> prefer French
> > as a source language if the only other choices were Spanish,
> > Portuguese and English, much in the same way that an English
> speaker
> > would prefer a language that gave birth to English than
> another
> > Indo-European language, though maybe German would have been a
> better
> > example. That's how all the tangents worked, I believe.
>
> My original post was to contrast the linguistic situation in the
> American continents with that of places like Asia where there
> are a lot more languages and a bigger diversity of languages.
> Someone brought up French, but I pointed out that the number of
> French speakers was relatively low compared to the major players
> (English, Spanish, Portuguese).
>
Are we only looking at first-language usage here? The reason for this
is even though Canada is mostly unilingual, the few years of French
education and official bilingualism still makes French easier to
understand than Spanish for Canadians. Back before I started studying
other languages French was the only language I was able to read to any
extent besides English.

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