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Kjell Rehnström wrote:
 >> For orthographies like Latin, Cyrillic, and Greek which have majuscule /
 >> minuscule forms this may make sense. However, many scripts of the world
 >> have no such pairs of forms; they just have undifferentiated latters.
 >>
 > Not to mention scripts like the Arabic one that has different letters if
 > they begin, stand in the middle of or at the end of the word. I think it
 > is not farfetched to suppose that this depends from the fact that the
 > Arabic letters were firsst written with some sort of pens.

The Arabic writing is similar to calligraphy (skönskrift) i.e. cursive 
continuous handwriting in the Latin alphabet (see 
http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~wh5a/personal/cursive.gif). Because writing 
is continuous it is likely that initial, medial and final letter forms 
are slightly different from each other. You don't need to write initial 
joining line to initial letters and final joining line to final letters. 
The difference is that cursive handwriting is the only writing mode in 
Arabic, whereas the Latin writing has also modes based on printed 
letters. So all in all the Latin script is much more complex than the 
Arabic script.

-- Risto Kupsala