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Donald J. HARLOW skrev:
>
>
> If I were to learn Interlingua, which of these should I take to mean 
> "horse"? Or would I have to learn all three? And which ones would I 
> use where? How would I know?
This is real hard. -estre means to me "that which lives in" or "has to 
do with". So "sylvestre" is somthing that lives in the woods, think 
"sylviculture", "Transsylvania", "paludestre" can be a plant that lives 
in a marsh (I thinnk it is in English, to lazy to check), pratestre can 
be a flower that lives on a meadow, "equestre" a man who lives on horses 
:-) , pedestre is one who lives on his feet, a "pedestrian". En Swedish 
we use a more puristic word meaningn "footgoers"!

I think Don H. makes it more difficult than it has got to be. Imagine in 
what complicated way one could describe Esperanto if there were a will 
to do so!

Somewhere in the back of my head I have some explanation of the "-est" 
in "celeste", as in "celestial mechanics", "celestial bodies". Is the 
form without an r a moderna creation, has it been taken from Latin in 
another stage than the classical one, or are there similar words. I 
don't know. I think there are more examples, but I cannot remember them.

Kjell R