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On Aug 5, 2007, at 6:55 AM, Michael Poxon wrote:

> I think a case could be made that, in normal English speech, what  
> is being produced here is not the phoneme cluster /ftsm/ but  
> instead /fcm/ even though /c/ is not an accepted phoneme of the  
> language, only occuring in "Correct" pronunciations of foreign  
> words that do possess this phoneme such as "Mozart" or "Zeitgeist"  
> - so you only need to assimilate /c/ to two neighbouring phonemes.  
> Be fun if /c/ became a new phoneme of English!
> Mike
>>>
>>> I'm sure that's meant as a generalization, but just to set the  
>>> record straight, I always pronounce the /t/ in "crafts" and in  
>>> "craftsman" no matter how rapidly I'm speaking.  I just can't  
>>> imagine saying "crafs."
>>

I'm not sure I follow. I get that you are using the symbol /c/ for  
the voiceless alveolar affricate, but I don't understand why you  
posit considering it a phoneme. Not to mention assimilating it to the  
two neighboring phonemes.