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Aha, so we can speak Russian! Nice. 
You know, I myself have noticed this z' component only recently. It is
quite difficult for me to pronounce a palatalized d without it; this
may be done, but then it sounds very unnatural.
I am not a phonetician (we have one in our team, though), but it seems
to me that this happens because of the tounge position when you
pronounce d' - it is very close to the one when you pronounce z'.



--- In [log in to unmask], MorphemeAddict@... wrote:
>
> In a message dated 8/5/2007 12:13:57 AM Central Daylight Time, 
> lingwadeplaneta@... writes:
> 
> 
> > I'm listening to my own speech and I can hear that there is. Only, not
> > to such extent as in Belorussian.
> > 
> > 
> > --- In [log in to unmask], MorphemeAddict@ wrote:
> > >
> > > In a message dated 8/4/2007 10:38:45 AM Central Daylight Time, 
> > > lingwadeplaneta@ writes:
> > > 
> > > 
> > > > Just one more remark. In the Russian "delat'" the first "d" is
> > > > palatalized, and in fact what is pronounced is [dz'elat']. 
> > > > 
> > > 
> > > No, there is no 'z' component in standard modern Russian "delat'".
> > > There is such a component in Belorusian, but it's spelled 'dz', too.
> > > 
> > > stevo   
> > >
> > 
> 
> I've studied Russian for over 30 years, but I'm definitely not a native 
> speaker.  If you say that's how you say, then that's how you say it.
> 
> stevo   </HTML>
>