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Thanks Dave !
I had already seen it from the website 'Blueprints for Babel" (available from 
J.Chandler's own site)at: www.homunculus.com/babel/aromanico.html
where I learnt it had been deviced by shoplifters facing some difficulties with 
esperanto. The site you're talking about only details the final (more analytic) 
grammar of RomÓnišo.
For me, it seems to be one out the many avatars of mixtures concocted 
between esperanto (or the like) and romance languages. 
This author contends at the beginning he has done something like a 
reconstruction of vulgar latin, that "it harkens back to the vulgar latin that still 
united the West before it diverged into the modern Romance languages". 
I really don't share this opinion. 
Of course, the vocabulary is romance; but some conlangs have already done it 
long before, like interlingua and occidental (Interlingua is more romance than 
the other, but occidental generally better analyses some word-formation 
processes in latin and romance languages). 
The grammar is a blend between esperanto and something that makes me 
think sometimes at novial. 
As in Ido, the author has dropped the accusative, the agreement of 
adjectives and nouns, and has adopted more naturalistic pronounciation 
concerning semi-voyels. The orthograph is more naturalistic too, but admits 
diacritics (š for example, tant mieux, j'ai un clavier franšais!)
The plural is made with a "s" as in most conlangs from occidental (insofar as 
they have kept the plural). 
But, many awkward features are kept from Esperanto: the (nearly) always 
obligatory endings for nouns (o), adjectives (a), adverbs (e). 
The conjugation represented here is mostly based on modal particles ("has" for 
the whole of past, as in yiddish or in alemanic dialects; "volde" for 
would, "van" for will). The present indicative ends with "en" (whence ?)
So, it appears to have been intended initially not really for international 
conjugation, but for a kind of secret jargon between colleagues. 
I don't see what this conlang brings more than the already existing and most 
used auxlangs like esperanto, ido, interlingua, occidental. 
In my opinion, auxlangers should not only focus on romance vocabulary, 
quarelling as to whether what is more romance or not...

Olivier 
http://sambahsa-mundialect-org.blogspot.com