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Jens Wilkinson skrev:
> Just an interesting experience in interlinguistics,
> but yesterday I was sitting in a Starbucks coffee shop
> in Tokyo, and just a few seats away there was an
> American guy talking to a Japanese guy in English. And
> I was kind of shocked, because the American guy was
> trying to convey the name, Leonardo Da Vinci, but the
> Japanese guy just couldn't get it. Finally, the
> American guy wrote it down. The gap in phonetics
> doesn't seem that terrible to me, but in this case it
> was really fatal for the conversation. The American
> guy was pronouncing Leonardo as Lionardo, which is
> normal English, and the "a" in "Da Vinci" was like a
> schwa, but still it didn't seem that hard to me. Just
> goes to show how our pronunciation and hearing habits
> really can be difficult. An IAL with just the five
> continental vowels would be so much easier...
>
>   
According to my not very scientific experience it is easier for me to 
understand Esperanto and Interlingua spoken with various accents than 
English. Remenber when I was at the Hamlet Castle in Helsingør in 
Denmark and the guide there spoke English and pronounced "soldier" so 
that I heard Soul Deer, and only after a fraction of a second did I 
realize what she meant. In Esperanto and Interlingua I have never had 
such problemes, even if I could easily guess what countries the speakers 
were from.

I have yet just limited experience of Occidental so it would be wrong of 
me to say anything about it, but I suppose theat my experience would be 
the same, knowing the rules for pronunciation.

Kjell R
Parlator linguae occidentalis in Scaepo cellus.