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> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of MacLeod Dave

> > Regional auxlangs are a good idea for their respective regions.
I
> > don't like the idea of scaling them to a global level.
> >
> Well, on that level it would no longer have anything to do with
what
> we think. We're talking about scales that auxlangs have never seen
> before. By the time an auxlang becomes the lingua franca of an
entire
> region, it's already out of our hands and well on its way to being
the
> world's only second language. That's the reason why ia
concentrates on
> a single region because it's not possible to promote it as-is the
way
> it is in places like Japan. Add 400 million fluent Europeans to
the
> mix though and nobody will care about its weak points.

That all sounds good until you figure it's alread been tried in
several different varieties over the past 120 years without any
success.  Last I checked the estimates put Interlingua at about 1500
users, not 400 million.  Not much penetration for 50 years in
existence.  English is probably gaining more than that in a single
day.

As Don H. likes to point out, specifics of design are really
irrelevant away, so you are right about need driving the market, but
there's no need so nobody's adopting these languages.  Why aren't
they adopting any of these new languages?  Because there's no
immediate payoff.  The only way there would ever be a payoff would
be to get a significant number of people to simultaneously start
learning a language, and *use* it in the *real world*, not just some
virtual world of Auxlangia.  Good luck trying to make that happen.
Even a worldlang doesn't stand much of a chance, but I'd at least it
doesn't tell the non-Westerners that they don't matter like
Euroclones do.