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Indeed or in deed?  If you try to provide morphosyntactic tags for  
things like "in vain" or "in general" you might well want to think of  
these as single adverbial expressions. "Isn't" may be "really" two  
words as Lou suggests, but it isn't so clear whether the same is true  
of "ain't."  The truth is that at the margins all these distinctions  
are very difficult, or as Wallace Stevens observed, "the squirming  
facts exceed the squamous mind."

MM
On Jan 17, 2008, at 10:55 AM, Martin Holmes wrote:
.
> Lou's Laptop wrote:
>> For
>> example you might  segment  "of course it isn't"  as follows
>> <w>of course</w>
>> <w>it</w>
>> <w>is</w><w>n't</w>
>
> I think I'd use <phr> here (or possibly <seg>):
>
> <phr><w>of</w> <w>course</w></phr>
>
> Wouldn't that make more sense? "Word" is notoriously difficult to  
> define, but we tend to know it when we encounter it (much like  
> "syllable"); I've never thought of "of course" as a word, and I  
> don't think many people would.
>
> Cheers,
> Martin
>
> Cheers,
> Martin
> -- 
> Martin Holmes
> University of Victoria Humanities Computing and Media Centre
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> Half-Baked Software, Inc.
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