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Indeed. Hearing an Arab speak Scanian with [?\] for /R/ was very funny
for some reason. Here in Sweden there is a special Immigrant's dialect
which of course varies geographically but is appears, perhaps
erroneously, more consistent compared to the various local versions of
Standard Swedish. The Scanian version stands out because Scanian
Standard Swedish stands out. Then for some reason the oddest thing is
to hear someone who doesn't look like an ethnic Swede speak with a
highly localized accent which is not colored by the Immigrants'
accent. I'd guess you get the same range of phenomena with
Gastarbeiterdeutsch, though. It probably says more about prejudices
than about anything else.

2008/2/27, Philip Newton <[log in to unmask]>:
> On Wed, Feb 27, 2008 at 12:50 PM, John Vertical
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> >  <zomg wut>
>
> lol
>
> Especially amusing coming from a non-native speaker, for some reason.
>
> (I suppose partly because learners are always expected to speak the
> standard language. Hearing a Japanese person speak German with a
> Bavarian accent would be similarly odd, I think, even if he learned
> the language while an exchange student in Hintertupfingen or
> something.)
>
> Cheers,
> --
> Philip Newton <[log in to unmask]>
>


-- 
/ BP