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You might also try the Librarians Internet Index
http://lii.org/ and search for journals
or here
http://www.theeuropeanlibrary.org/portal/ and connect with all the
national libraries of Europe
or google 'linguistics journal' and get
http://www.google.com/search?q=linguistics+journal&btnG=Search&hl=en
with links to 798 000 sites including, for example,
the Cambridge Journals Online
http://journals.cambridge.org/
where you can get pdf copies of articles such as these from the
current issue of the Journal of Linguistics
http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayIssue?jid=LIN&volumeId=44&issueId=01#
As for the Oceanic Linguistics journal, go here
http://muse.jhu.edu/journals/ol/
and you can get pdf copies of the articles.

Libraries are institutions (for those of us who belong in one).
JSTOR does not control all access to journals. Libraries and schools
provide many online freely.
Also, have you contacted the alumni association of the institution
from which you hope to get a degree about the kinds of support they
provide? They might give you access to all your favorites.
De god zegent u altijd, alle manieren,
Paul

On Mon, Mar 3, 2008 at 6:41 PM, Amanda Babcock Furrow
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> This is wild dreaming and maybe not to the right forum (but there is not
>  yet an LCS forum to which to post it, so...)
>
>  The benefit I would be most excited to see from the LCS, but which would
>  require that it have a thriving budget, would be... JSTOR access!  I am
>  staring down the barrel of hopefully completing my online degree within
>  the next year, and from all I can tell, individuals simply cannot get
>  access to the wonderful databases of journal articles that I can currently
>  access as a student.  Sure, you can pay a huge yearly subscription and
>  get just the International Journal of American Linguistics articles... but
>  even that is too expensive for me, and besides, there are other journals :)
>  But JSTOR, which for the uninitiated provides access to hundreds of journals
>  including the IJAL, Oceanic Linguistics, and even the archives of the Journal
>  of Cuneiform Studies, only wants to deal with institutions.  So, why not
>  become an institution?
>
>  (Ok, I went and looked at the numbers: provided we could convince them
>  that we were a non-profit research institution to begin with, we would
>  undoubtedly fall into their Very Small Institution classification, and
>  therefore only pay $1500 upfront plus $500 a year for their "Arts &
>  Sciences Complement", a bundle of currently 143 titles including the
>  above-mentioned journals.)
>
>  A benefit like this, something that I can only obtain as a member of a
>  group, would truly make LCS membership worthwhile to me.
>
>  Thanks,
>  Amanda
>