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> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Antonielly
Garcia Rodrigues

> >  Taking words from everywhere results in a situation like you
see in
> >  Japanese where you have just enough loanwords to mix things up,
but
> >  not enough that people understand how to derive new terms.
Ever heard
> >  from a person learning Japanese that the English loanwords
actually
> >  make things more complicated? That's what a worldlang  would
probably
> >  feel like. Sometimes your native language is there, sometimes
it
> >  isn't. And when you have certain words (let's say ulus for
nation from
> >  Turkish), you have a totally different term (let's say nashonal
for
> >  national instead of ulusal from ulus) that makes the language
feel
> >  like a bit of a hodgepodge.
> >
> 
> I believe you see this problem because of the strong notion of
"taking
> words from a lot of different languages". This notion also
includes
> the idea that we should preserve the semantic contents of each
word
> intact.
> 
> If, in the language design, we replace this notion by a weaker
one,
> then this problem disappears. A weaker notion: The words in a
> worldlang X would not be Russian words + English words + Japanese
> words + Arabic words + (...), they would be X words. It would just
> happen that some X words would be *etymologically related* to
certain
> English words, other X words would be etymologically related to
> Russian words, and so on.

Well stated as usual.  This is Sasxsek's method.  Semantically the
words have a meaning of their own, but a variety of familar labels
are attached as a mnemonic aid.  


> ...

> Is this system "unnatural"? Not really. The same notion of
> "etymologically related" words occurs in natlangs. Portuguese and
> English have a lot of words which are common in form (and in
origin)
> but which do not have exactly the same semantic scope. The verb
> "support" is a good example of this. And even those "false
friends"
> help learning and memorization once we recognize them as "false
> friends". It is certainly easier for a Brazilian to learn the
English
> verb "support" (which does not mean the same as "suportar",
although
> there is still a mnemonic relationship) than to learn the
equivalent
> Japanese word.

Yes, false friends are often memory aids unto themselves provided
you don't learn them the hard way by misusing or misreading them in
a real-world setting.  A couple of my favories are French "poisson"
(fish) which looks like English "poison", and along similar lines
the German "gift" which does mean "poison".


> ...