Print

Print


--- In [log in to unmask], steve rice <ansric@...> wrote:
>
> --- Dmitri Ivanov <lingwadeplaneta@...> wrote:
> 
> > --- In [log in to unmask], MacLeod Dave
> > <mithradates@> wrote:
> > >
> > > 2008/3/25, Dmitri Ivanov <lingwadeplaneta@>:
> > > But e.g. with
> > > >  "daraba" (strike, hit) I like "darbi" more than
> > darabi because >
> > > then
> > > >  the noun is "darba" which coincudes with the
> > Arabic one (also it > is
> > > >  similar to the Russian udar, udarit').
> > > >
> > > That's also closer to the Turkish form too - they
> > use darbe. Coup
> > > d'etat for example is hükümet darbesi (si just
> > shows that it's
> > > attached to hükümet).
> > > 
> > I recall now that the decision to adopt "darbi" was
> > also due to the
> > Chinese da(3) and to several Hindi forms containing
> > "ar": marna,
> > parna, prahar karna. It's clever to take into
> > account not simply
> > loanwords but general sound shape in different
> > languages. So in
> > "darbi", actually taken from Arabic, there is also
> > something close to
> > Chinese, Russian and Hindi in its sound shape, to
> > say nothing of the
> > related words in Turkish etc. That's the way LdP
> > works. 
> > 
> It's also similar to the composite primitive technique
> of Loglan, only on a less formalized level.
> 
> Steve
> 
> 

The difference is that the words are real, no fantastic words like
"bukshu" (buk+shu) are produced. Also, a similar sound form is just
one of the factors to be considered, but it is not always present. 

Dmitry