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2008/4/25 Dmitri Ivanov <[log in to unmask]>:
> --- In [log in to unmask], MacLeod Dave <mithradates@...> wrote:
>  >
>
>
> > >  >Also "salam" has been mentioned as a word that some people could
>  > findnot too nice.
>  > >
>  > >  I say definitely go with "salam".  I like the idea of using a
>  > worldlang to reach out to Arabs/Muslims, who are getting such a raw
>  > deal nowadays.  That's one reason why I included Arabic in my
>  > worldlang idea that I posted a few weeks ago.
>  > >
>  > But not everybody agrees with you on that point, and bringing in a
>  > definite Arabic-style greeting could have the same effect. For some
>  > people words like inshallah, salam, allahu akbar and so on would
>  > come
>  > across as being a type of religious subterfuge. My favorite greeting
>  > is the Estonian 'tere'. Nobody can hate that.
>  >
>  > --
>
>  There is always someone who can hate or used to hate this or that.
>  Looking for bad associations, we can always find them. Some people in
>  Arabic countries might hate English, but that is not a reason to avoid
>  English words. Let's just be reasonable: the Arabic language is one of
>  the most spoken ones, so it's appropriate to take words from it.
>  (But of course to take "Allah" for "God" would be wrong.)

That was my whole point actually (so I agree with you). James has
decided that swasti is offensive but that salam can't be, because he
doesn't find it offensive. I was pointing out that it's entirely
possible that somebody else would find something like salam offensive,
right or wrong.

I also agree though that it's generally best to avoid conflict when
possible. I've always suspected that Esperanto's mi fartas bone (one
of the first phrases you ever learn) has turned off a few English
speakers here or there. You know, the types that are willing to give
it a minute of their time, hear a few words and then decide that it
sounds silly. Not that those types would make the best converts
though.


-- 
http://mithridates.blogspot.com