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--- In [log in to unmask], Jens Wilkinson <jenswilkinson@...> wrote:
>
> On Fri, Apr 25, 2008 at 9:52 PM, Dmitri Ivanov <lingwadeplaneta@...>
> wrote:
> 
> >
> > (But of course to take "Allah" for "God" would be wrong.)
> 
> 
> Not necessarily wrong, but probably not very smart. For a word like
> "god",
> it's definitely best to use a word from a language that other people
> won't
> be offended by.
> 

It's especially difficult in Pakistan and India. IIRR Asura is god in
Pakistan but demon in India, and Daeva is god in India but demon in
Pakistan. We have taken boh. It's Slavic and related to Hindi's
Bhagavan and bhakti (love).

> 
> > Swastika is basically an ancient solar symbol, as well as other
> > crosses. I think most peoples on Earth worshiped Sun in some period of
> > their history. One of the Russian solar gods was named Swarog. Another
> > was called Hors - the word related to "horosho" (good) (and to
> > Sambahsa's khauris). Sun was associated with boon, good. I am not sure
> > if the Hindi "surya" (sun, also adopted into LdP) is related to "su"
> > (good) but that is possible. Another widespread Hindi name for the sun
> > is "suraj" which might be understood as "good ruler" (but that's only
> > my speculation).
> >
> 
> This is the kind of thing I am very interested in. How do people come up
> with words for certain things, and how are these words related?
Actually, I
> set up a wiki to put down my notes on these kinds of words (
> http://worldetymology.pbwiki.com/). I don't know quite how to do it,
but I
> think it would be wonderful to have a reference that shows exactly those
> kinds of things, i.e. what words are related to one another.
> 

Give the password for the wiki to Olivier and you'll be happy! :)
About "window": in Russian "okno" is very close to "oko" (eye).