Print

Print


I'm talking about the lower parts of  Canada. I live in Nova Scotia.
I haven't really been to the north...inuit has an interesting alphabet,
similar to hiragana, but perhaps a bit simpler.
-John

On Fri, Apr 25, 2008 at 3:43 PM, Abrigon Gusiq <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> Just how things go, likely we use "Eskimo" is the locals accept
>  it. But we have more than one type, some that Canada has namely
>  Inuit/Inupiaq, but as you get further in, towards St. Lawrence
>  Island, and Bethel area, then you have Yupik/Chupik, who prefer
>  to be called Yupik or Chupik last I checked. So to have a word
>  for all of the various peoples, we use Eskimo. As long as the
>  derived words that are offensive are used.. Wild how a single
>  syllable can change the meaning of a word.
>
>  Siberian Yupiks seem to prefer to be called Siberian Yupik.
>
>  Much like if you want to annoy someone. Example I have found,
>  say Masiq to someone from down river, they do get annoyed, since
>  Masiq is how they say it up river. Versus Basi or Anabasiq or
>  Basiq. I don't quite get it right.
>
>  Wild is when both get near a Navajo or Aache speakers, they can
>  talk in basic concepts.. They are related languages after all.
>
>  I wonder if Esperanto will have these fun times? I expect it
>  will. There is already I hear some differences in how some speak
>  it? Or is that one of the other Constructed Lingos (I love using
>  the term Lingo, sort of related to Lingua).
>
>  Mike
>
>
>
>
>  ----- Original Message -----
>  From: "John Campbell" <[log in to unmask]>
>  To: <[log in to unmask]>
>
> Sent: Friday, April 25, 2008 12:22 PM
>  Subject: Re: Mr. Mrs. Ms. Sir or Madame
>
>
>
>
> In Canada, I guess calling someone an eskimo would be kind of
>  offensive,
>  but doing it would make you look like an idiot probably. I'm
>  Canadian.
>  -John
>