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> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Dmitri Ivanov

> show up anywhere? The labelling would likely be in a Western
language,
> with Chinese showing up perhaps only in the non-romanized form.
After
> all, we've had Japanese electronics for decades, and "den" doesn't
> seem to have much currency as a result. (And they're more likely
to
> put romaji on labels, too.)
> > 
> > Steve
> > 
> 
> Many possible ways. Say, they come up with something specifically
> Chinese like the Japanese tamagotchi. Tamago (egg) is now known
very
> widely. Or they create a corporation named "General electrics" (in
> Mandarin) which becomes famous. In Russia people already know
> "Samsung" better than Samson. (And, btw, due to a very high
occurrence
> of this word it does not even seem odd to our ear - that's an
> interesting point because it shows that an "odd" look of a
worldlang
> may be simply a matter of habit).
> Of course that's only speculation but what is real is that dyen is
> already widespread and handy. Note that nobody says "electronic
mail",
> that's way too long. 

I wouldn't expect brand names to help much.  There are already a
number of Asian brands common in the U.S. but virtually nobody knows
that Matsushita means "National", or that Mitsubishi means (ISTR)
"Three Blade" even with the help of the logo.  Hitachi?  Denso?
Well, I don't even know those, yet.   Even European brands like
Blaupunkt (blue dot) are not known by their meanings.  To Americans
these are mostly just names.  We already have General Electric
though most people know it these days as just GE.  

Samsung is also very well known here (I'm staring at a pair of 19"
Samsung monitors right now) but again, I don't know what the word
means.  Though writing this had made me curious enough to look it up
somewhere.