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Benct Philip Jonsson wrote:
> On 2008-05-19 ROGER MILLS wrote:
>  > Michigan, properly, should be divided roughly
>  > down the middle between ET and CT; but the whole
>  > state is ET, I suppose for commercial reasons.
>  > That means that my little town on the shores of
>  > Lake Michigan (~90 miles E of Chicago/Milwaukee)
>  > has very late sunsets on Summer DST (great!).
> 
> 
> It has always been my opinion that Scandinavia
> should have DST all year round, since we could do
> well with late sunsets in the winter in
> particular. Nobody cares that it's dark when they
> go *to* work, but it might be nice to have an hour
> of daylight left when you come *from* work.
> Perhaps it doesn't really apply to workfromhomers
> like me, but mylady would appreciate it for sure.

I care! Anything worth doing after work in the winter when it's
miserable (raining a few times a week, if you're lucky) and cold (ten
degrees at lunchtime, maybe) is going to be just as doable in the light
as the dark. But going to work in the dark would be so depressing. And
would probably increase the number of accidents because you'd still be
groggy from getting up in the dark! (Personally, I kill anyone who wakes
me up before the sun is well and truly up there.)

Incidentally --- one thing I've noted is that Scandinavians in Melbourne
think it's cold here (lowest overnight low I've seen: zero degrees, in
July), but Germans don't. Why? It doesn't make intuitive sense to me.
Does snow have some warming effect, and it presumably snows less in
(parts of) Germany, so the snowless cold of Melbourne is more familiar?
Are Germans simply more reasonable in their expectation of Melbourne's
weather (yes, we're Australia, no we're not Queensland), and therefore
surprised less?

--
Tristan.