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> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Jens
Wilkinson

> No, they wouldn't. It's true that there are count words, but 
> they would only be used to distinguish eating one pig from 
> eating two or three pigs, which doesn't make a lot of sense. 
> :) If they wanted to emphasize eating the whole animal, they 
> would use a word "marugoto" which means "completely". Just to 
> give you an example, in Japanese, "ki" means both tree (an 
> object) and wood (part of the object). So "I saw a tree" is 
> "ki o mita", whereas "this chair is made of wood" is "kono 
> isu ga ki de dekite iru." So as you can see, the word "ki" is 
> used exactly the same. And there is no confusion, because 
> it's understood from the context. In English, you would never 
> say "I saw wood," and you would never understand a chair as 
> being made of a single tree. So with pig, if in Japanese you 
> said "buta o tabeta," it could either mean "I ate a pig" or 
> "I ate pork", but (1) it's understood from the context and 
> (2) in any case, it doesn't matter, unless you want to 
> emphasize that you ate the whole thing, in which case you 
> would make it clear by saying "I ate whole pig". 

Sasxsek does have a dictinction but not quite the way English
does it because it's a derivatice.  "suin" is "pig", as in the
animal while "suino". roughly "pig product", would indicate
something that comes from a pig like pork, though it wouldn't
necessarily refer to the meat.  Exactly what would have to be
figured out from context though "suinxnik' (pig+flesh) could be
used to be more specific.