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HI David,

As far as image file formats are concerned, I'd recommend:

  - High resolution TIFF files for archive (as big as you can get, really).

  - Full-size JPEG versions of the TIFFs, to make detailed views 
available on the Web, and for use during the markup process.

  - Browser-sized JPEG versions (say 800px wide) for page-level display 
on the Web.

  - Thumbnails for "gallery browsing" functionality.


Here's an example from our Mariage project:

The Gallery: 
<http://mariage.uvic.ca/gallery.xq?docFilter=gravure&startFrom=1>
(This has two sizes of thumbnail, which are actually cropped for effect).

The 800px version:
<http://mariage.uvic.ca/xhtml.xq?id=operateur_cephalique>
(Marked up with the Image Markup Tool.)

The full-size JPEG:
<http://mariage.uvic.ca/scans/P123-IFFNo190.jpg>
(The reader can access this by double-clicking a marked-up area on the 
image to bring up a segment of it at full size.)

The original TIFFs from the Bibliothèque Nationale de France are archived.

Cheers,
Martin

Birnbaum, David J wrote:
> Dear TEI-L,
> 
> I am organizing a small image-based project, involving the digital publication of a Russian festal icon with commentary. The icon contains 27 small images of church events (Annunciation, Nativity, etc.), arranged on the board much like a comic strip (an example of this type of icon is available at http://www.dormitionskete.org/DsWebStore/images/DsProducts/MS-FD-Cretan_org.gif). I would like the electronic edition to include photographs of the icon as a whole and of each of the small images, with textual information attached at both levels.
> 
> I don’t have much experience with descriptive metadata for image files, or, for that matter, with image resources in general, and I’d be grateful for any information anyone might provide about 1) image formats (I envision something high quality for archival purposes and lower-resolution for web delivery--but I don’t know what resolutions, color depths, file formats, etc. are consistent with what professionals regard as best practice) and 2) descriptive metadata (whether art historical, photographic, or other--again, in a way that is consistent with professional best practice). I’d also welcome pointers to similar projects others might have developed, exposure to which might broaden my understanding of what’s possible and what’s desirable.
> 
> The TEI guidelines don’t seem to deal with this type of project explicitly, which is reasonable, since it is not fundamentally a “text encoding” activity. Nonetheless, I suspect that many readers of TEI-L have dealt with these issues, and I’d be grateful for any advice or suggestions. I have poked around on the web in search of metadata standards for images, but those resources don’t give me a good sense of what people are doing in actual projects.
> 
> Sincerely,
> 
> David
> [log in to unmask]<mailto:[log in to unmask]>
> 
> 

-- 
Martin Holmes
University of Victoria Humanities Computing and Media Centre
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Half-Baked Software, Inc.
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