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On 2008-08-13 Eugene Oh wrote:
> I see, that's now cleared up. But one other question surfaces: is 
> <rk> [S_j]
> a common sound sequence in all Scandinavian? Swedish only? The 
> Norrköping
> dialect only? I ask because I've only heard of <sk> undergoing such a
> change.
> Eugene
> 

It has nothing to do with [rk].  As you have observed [rs]
becomes [s`] (Pinyin <sh>) in most Swedish dialects, but
there is also a much older sound change whereby [k] before
front vowels became [s\] (Pinyin <x>) before front vowels, 
to be sure by way of [ts\] (Pinyin <q>) which is preserved 
in some dialects.  Note that the [r] is still intact in
[nor's\2:piN] (as it is pronounced in my lect, alveolar
trill and all! :-) If I were to dare to spell _Norrköping_
in Pinyin it would be "nor-xe-ping" or "nor-qe-ping".
NB the writing system doesn't mark either sound change :-(.
This leads to minimal pairs sometimes, due to later loan
words with velars before front vowels.

If you find CXS hard, have a look at Hentrik's site
<http://www.theiling.de/ipa/>.  There's even a
two-way CXS <-> Unicode IPA converter!


/BP 8^)>
-- 
Benct Philip Jonsson -- melroch atte melroch dotte se
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
  "C'est en vain que nos Josués littéraires crient
  à la langue de s'arrêter; les langues ni le soleil
  ne s'arrêtent plus. Le jour où elles se *fixent*,
  c'est qu'elles meurent."           (Victor Hugo)