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Dmitri Ivanov wrote:
> --- In [log in to unmask], steve rice <ansric@...> wrote:
>> --- On Sat, 10/18/08, Dmitri Ivanov <lingwadeplaneta@...> wrote:
>>
>>> Are here any Glosa speakers on this list? If yes, I have a
>>> couple of
>>> questions for you.
>>> I've been looking at Glosa Inter-Reti Diktionaria:
>>> http://www.glosa.org/gid/glen.htm
>>> http://www.glosa.org/gid/engl.htm
>>>
>>> It seems to be very elaborated and systematized. There are
>>> thousands
>>> of words which are marked according to
>>> frequency/importance. 
>>> What I don't understand is how you deal with synonims,
>>> there are a lot
>>> of them. 
>> There are indeed. This is one of the reasons I bailed from Glosa
> around 1990, though I've since regretted it. Some background:
>> One of the distinctive features of Interglossa was that it allowed
> synonyms. Several concepts had two different forms, and very few had
> three. Hogben's reasoning here was two-fold:
>> 1. Sometimes a synonym was phonologically or morphologically
> simpler, especially important since his mostly Hellenic vocabulary had
> some annoying consonant clusters. Both "kako" and "mali" will be
> slightly easier than "dis."
>> 2. Sometimes the internationality of synonyms will vary. Thus, in
> Anglo-Romance "mali" will be recognizable, but it's less commo in
> Russian. For an educated russophone, however, "kako" will be meaningful.
> 
> -- That's true. For an educated as well as for a completely uneducated
> russophone, "kaka" is a childish term for excrement (the same as the
> French "caca" - from the Latin "cacare" to defecate), so the meaning
> is indeed similar. (As to "mal, mali", for Russians it's "small".)
> 
>> Hogben maintained that this would not produce an actual problem, as
> it's easy to achieve passive recognition of the synonyms you don't use
> while saving active use for the ones you prefer. He also speculated
> that over time the synonyms would differentiate, allowing writers a
> degree of nuance.
> 
> -- That would definitely happen, as there never exist two words with
> exactly the same meaning and usage. 
> 
>> Fast-forward to Glosa, a very different project, no matter what plu
> Glosa-pe may think. In theory, Glosa has a core vocabulary ("Glosa
> 1000") and an extended vocabulary. They at least used to say that 
> there would be no homonyms within the core vocabulary, though some of
> the extended terms conflicted with basic ones. But more important,
> they began distinguishing between synonyms. 
> 
> -- apparently they decided to leave all synonyms for "food" intact and
> undistinguished
> 
> 
> In IG, "caco" and "malo"
> meant exactly the same thing; in Glosa, apparently there is a
> theoretical difference between "kako" and "mali."
> 
> -- however it is still difficult to grasp
> 
I wondered whether the difference was that one meant bad as in poor 
quality and the other meant bad as in evil, but both appear to include 
the meaning "vicious".