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Olivier Simon wrote:
> Sellamat Cheng!
> 
> On Sat, 1 Nov 2008 09:16:40 +1100, Cheng-Zhong Su 
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> 
>>> No, I meant the encounter of the final consonant of a word (which
>>> can be a grammatical ending) with the first consonant of the
>>> following word. Yes, there are many homophones in French, but I
>>> don't think it works as in Chinese. In Mandarin, for example,
>>> "ma" can mean mother, horse, insult or hemp, but all of them are
>>> distinguished by the use of pitches.
 >>>
>> It is not pitches but tone.
>> 
> I thought that the English words "tone" and "pitch" had the same 
> meaning. In French, we only have "ton".
> 
[snip]
I doubt that any pair of different words in English have the same 
meaning! :-)

In linguistics the correct word is "tone", just as in physics there is a 
distinction between "speed" and "velocity", which in normal usage mean 
roughly the same. I think that "tone" includes how something is said, so 
it's not just the pitch (frequency) but also the change in pitch (high, 
low, rising, falling).