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2008/11/8 deinx nxtxr <[log in to unmask]>:
>> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Rick Harrison
>
>> >Actually, as it's properly understood, the English Only
>> movement is not at
>> all antithetical to auxlanging; rather, it's an obvious
>> corollary of it.
>>
>> If an auxlang becomes popular and is used by, for example, a
>> lot of tourists
>> and immigrants, it would be logical to provide road signs and
>> 911 emergency
>> telephone service in the auxlang. English Only legislation
>> would prevent that.
>
> If another auxlang becomes that popular then the U.S. would need to
> rethink its language policy to align itself with the rest of the
> globe.  That isn't a reality, nor is even likely.  What we do have
> are floods of immigrants coming here expecting us to bend over
> backwards for them when they are the ones that should be working to
> assimilate.

It happens in other countries quite a bit. Tatars in Russia for
example haven't been able to write their own language in Latin letters
due to laws that require it to be written in Cyrillic.

http://www.cdi.org/russia/johnson/2007-60.cfm

Silly court battles like this are an expensive waste of time. The case
could be made for making English an official language, but it would be
a big kerfuffle like the "learn English or get out" rule the LPGA
tried to impose but gave up on after a storm of negative publicity.
Better would be for people to recognize that in most cases immigrants
*want* to speak English well and don't want to be pandered to.

-- 
http://mithridates.blogspot.com