Print

Print


2008/11/8 deinx nxtxr <[log in to unmask]>:
>> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of MacLeod Dave
>
>> The other point of view on the official English situation is that
> you
>> need a certain amount of linguistic chaos in a place for the idea
> of
>> an IAL to take root, and if the US is unified around an
> English-only
>> policy then there will be no real need for an IAL in the minds of
> the
>> people that live there. Add to that the fact that it's the most
>> influential country in the world, and you have a tough situation
> in
>> trying to promote an IAL elsewhere as well. Personally I think
> Spanish
>> is one of the largest allies that current IALs have, because:
>> 1) It's quite strong within the US,
>> 2) It looks a lot like the three most used IALs and the more
> people
>> know of Spanish the more they'll be able to recognize them,
>> 3) It's a lot easier to learn and use than English for a lot of
> people
>> that have trouble with English pronunciation and spelling, and can
>> help remind people that there are easier alternatives out there.
>
> I expect the Spanish speaking parts of the world to be the last ones
> to assimilate English.

Not gonna happen. Everything else you wrote I agree with.

> Mainly for the same reasons you mention.
> They have a similar situation in Latin America where Spanish is
> really the only language they need to get along, with the obvious
> exception of Brazil but Portuguese is still a related language and
> I'd expect there's some mutual intelligibility.
>
>
>> It has nothing to do with political correctness. Who knows if
> Zamenhof
>> would have ever decided to invent Esperanto if he had come from
> the
>> middle of North America instead of Bialystok.
>
> It depends where in North America.  If he was in the Midwest,
> probably not.  If he was living in somewhere like New York which was
> being flooded with immigrants from Europe at the time, I'd expect
> he'd have done just what he did in Bialystok.
>



-- 
http://mithridates.blogspot.com