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> [mailto:[log in to unmask]] On Behalf Of Paul Bartlett

> What is best for you?  I honestly have no answer to your question.
My
> suggestion is that you make yourself familiar with several,
although
> that does not mean that you have to become proficient in any of
them to
> make your own choice.  Also, there are some individuals who have
at
> least some competence in more than one.  (For instance, there are
some
> people who are more or less competent in both Ido and Esperanto,
and
> some in both IALA Interlingua and Occidental/Interlingue.)

That's right.  It's really not our place to decide for someone else.
All we can really do is help someone to make an informed decision.
The first thing I'd be asking myself is just why I want to learn
another language in the first place, then not really make a
distinction between natural and artificial.  If the purpose of
learning another language is simply to learn one as some type of
mental excercise then I'd say just about any one would work.  If
time is important then an artificial language will certainly cut
down on the learning time.  If you want a language that's going to
be usable in everyday life, then artificial languages don't have
much to offer because of their small and scattered user populations.
If the point is to have a group of people to communicate with
online, just about any of the languages are workable but the
Esperanto community is much larger than all the others combined.