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On Sat, 15 Nov 2008 05:35:55 +0100, Kjell Rehnstr÷m <[log in to unmask]> 
wrote:


>Many years ago I had access to a French programming from Canada, as I
>had Canale 5 which is an international French channel. And at least as I
>remember, the Canadian French was quite different in pronunciation from
>the French I will hear on TV or in movies here.
>
>Kjell R

Io pensa que tu parla pri "TV5"!
In fact, the phonetic value of the sounds is in general the same. "R" are 
thrilled, and nasals are... even more nasal than in European French (we've got 
the impression that they speak from the nose!). But intonations are very 
different, they tend to speak quicker, and to swallow more "e" (schwa sound) 
than in European French. And they use in everyday speech some words that 
don't exist in European French, or which have a slightly different meaning
(ex: Canadians would call a car "un char", while French speaking people from 
other continents know only "auto(mobile)" or "voiture"; for them, un char is 
pulled by horses or oxen!)
When sung, these intonations are less to be heard. There are lot of French 
singing people from Canada (the best known is CÚline Dion) and there are in 
general no problems of understanding. 
In fact, there are many "accents" in French, I mean slight differences in the 
pronounciation (intonation, a few different sounds). If we consider the 
educated French of central France to be the standard, we can guess tthe 
origin of a speaker of French at his accent (Southern France, Former german-
speaking of France, Switzerland, Belgium, Canada, Black Africa, Maghreb...., 
and even from the countryside of my own region....). 
Personnally, I suppose I use the "standard" pronounciation of French, though I 
must employ some "local" words that do not exist in "official" French. 

Olivier from Lorraine