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Martin,

There is a drawback to this approach: the chance for human error is 
multiplied tremendously across your corpus of documents. That is, 
entering CSS directly in @rend works fine as long as no encoder ever 
enters rend="font-style: italics" or rend="font-variant: small-cap" 
(former shouldn't have an s, latter should). Personally, I'm not that 
trusting. I'd rather customize the schema to allow only predefined 
values for @rend ("italic", "small-caps", etc.) and then let my XSLT 
translate to CSS for display.

Greg Murray
University of Virginia Library


Martin Holmes wrote:
> Hi all,
> 
> The global attribute @rend is wonderfully loose ("any string of 
> characters", "These Guidelines make no binding recommendations for the 
> values of the @rend attribute..."). However, I'm increasingly finding 
> that CSS is everything I need and more for the @rend attribute, and in a 
> current project, I'm considering converting all my old formulations 
> (rend="italic" etc., derived from old usage, examples and guidelines) 
> over to pure CSS (rend="font-style: italic").
> 
> Can anyone see any objection to this on principle? Have you come across 
> any rendering features which are impossible to describe in CSS?
> 
> Cheers,
> Martin