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You can kinda-sorta turn non-high vowels into glides, but they're not very distinct from w or y (or j), and easily become those.  Non-high glides do not exist as discrete segments in any natural language that I'm aware of.

--- On Wed, 4/8/09, Edgard Bikelis <[log in to unmask]> wrote:

> From: Edgard Bikelis <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: Quick question about diphthongs
> To: [log in to unmask]
> Date: Wednesday, April 8, 2009, 6:07 PM
> Indeed, but why does [i u] have a
> respective glide, and, say, [a] does not?
> 
> [ei] ~ [ej]
> [eu] ~ [ew]
> [ea] ~ ?
> 
> Edgard
> 
> On Wed, Apr 8, 2009 at 6:10 PM, J. Burke <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> 
> > Diphthongs in u and i are most common because of the
> nature of diphthongs
> > themselves--they're glides between two distinct vowel
> sounds, and the high
> > vowels (u, i) most easily become glides (the
> semivowels w, y).
> >
> > --- On Wed, 4/8/09, Linvi Charles <[log in to unmask]>
> wrote:
> >
> > > From: Linvi Charles <[log in to unmask]>
> >
>