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Mark J. Reed wrote:
> I think the line between affricates and stop+fricative clusters is not
> a very sharp one.   

To some extent it depends on the morphophonemics of the language. The 
final sound of _bats_ is probably better thought of as a cluster since 
we are adding the plural morpheme to _bat_.

[snip]
> 
> Is the onset of <tsunami>, for Anglophones who "pronounce the [t]",
> actually [t_s], or is it simply [ts]?

Mine is [t_s] - the instances I've heard sound like an affricate rather 
than a cluster. certainly in Japanese - and that's the language that 
began this particular thread - it's [t_s] (and phonemically /t/).

> I think it's clear that the /ks/ in words like "box" is a cluster
> rather than an affricate, since [k] and [s] have different points of
> articulation.

Absolutely - the friction release must be in the same (or practically 
the same) PoA.
--------------------------------------------------

Alex Fink wrote:
[snip]
 >
 > On Thu, 9 Apr 2009 19:14:21 +0100, R A Brown 
<[log in to unmask]> wrote:
 >
 >> (i.e. not the friction that accompanies an aspirated
 >> release - except in the very rare affricate [?h)] )
 >
 > Huh, I didn't think that [?h)] ever occurred.  Do you have more 
details on
 > any occurrences?  In the languages where it does happen, is there clear
 > reason to analyse it as an affricate?

According to Yuen Ren Chao, [?_h] occurs in the Yunnan variant of 
Mandarin, where the standard Beijing dialect has [k_h]. On reflexion, it 
is better analyzed as an aspirated glottal stop rather than a glottal 
affricate (tho the sounds are, of course, identical).

-- 
Ray
==================================
http://www.carolandray.plus.com
==================================
"Ein Kopf, der auf seine eigene Kosten denkt,
wird immer Eingriffe in die Sprache thun."
[J.G. Hamann, 1760]
"A mind that thinks at its own expense
will always interfere with language".


-- 
Ray
==================================
http://www.carolandray.plus.com
==================================
"Ein Kopf, der auf seine eigene Kosten denkt,
wird immer Eingriffe in die Sprache thun."
[J.G. Hamann, 1760]
"A mind that thinks at its own expense
will always interfere with language".