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Indeed.  Just like the "ch" in "ichiban", "tamagotchi",etc - also
phonemically /t/, or perhaps /t:/, is not a /tS/ cluster, nor the "j"
in "dojo" a /dZ/ one.  Since we have those affricates in English, we
don't think of them as clusters, but /ts)/ is just as much a single
phone in many other languages.

On Wed, Apr 8, 2009 at 11:31 PM, Garth Wallace <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> And even if it was phonemically distinct from /t/, it's an affricate,
> not a cluster.
>
> On Wed, Apr 8, 2009 at 8:12 PM, Ronald Craig <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>> On Apr 9, 2009, at 11:26 AM, Gary Shannon wrote:
>>
>>> --- On Wed, 4/8/09, <deinx nxtxr> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>>
>>>>  On the
>>>> other hand Japanese has a (C)V(N) syllable shape, and some
>>>> polynesian languages have (C)V using no consonant clusters
>>>> at all.
>>>
>>> I thought "tsunami" was a Japanese word. I can't think of
>>> any native Enlgish words that start with a "TS" cluster.
>>
>> Phonemically it's /tunami/. The [ts] is an affricate allophone of /t/
>> occurring before /u/, so counts as C.
>>
>> But no, no native English words with initial TS.
>>
>> Which is why everyone says "sunami". :)
>>
>> --Ron
>>
>



-- 
Mark J. Reed <[log in to unmask]>