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> From: Eugene Oh <[log in to unmask]>
> Quick question: what would the "koe" refer to here? 

"Ketchup" predates the availability of tomatoes, actually. :) Originally, it was apparently fish sauce, a dark brown clear liquid still popular in SE Asian cuisine (every Thai and Vietnamese diner I've been to in Detroit has a bottle on the table); the Roman Empire also had a fish sauce, although it's unclear exactly what it tasted like, and some brands of steak sauce have anchovies as an ingredient. The 1828 Webster's Dictionary defines catsup as a mushroom sauce (http://1828.mshaffer.com/d/word/catsup). The first tomato ketchup recipe appeared around 1801; Heinz launched his product in 1876 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ketchup). Since then, "ketchup" has become synonymous with the tomato product; like "pickle," it appears to be a case where a term for a general food prep method has become attached to a specific ingredient (although of course "pickled" as an adjective is still understood as associated with different vegetables).

-- Paul