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Well, the most obvious case was the replacement of the various german
curencies (all of which were not decimalized) by the fully decimalized
gold mark after the unification, with one goldmark = 100 pfennig ou le
rigsdaller danois divisé en 96 skilling, which was replaced by the krone
( 100 oere).

As for the Soled it was part of a monetary reform in the late XIXth,
following the general trend at the time. Old coins (and banknotes) were
just withdrawn, as happened, for instance with the replacement of the
French Franc by the Euro.


Le mardi 14 avril 2009 à 11:56 -0400, Alex Fink a écrit :
> On Tue, 14 Apr 2009 16:04:05 +0200, [log in to unmask]
> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
> [Philip Newton wrote:]
> >2009/4/14 [log in to unmask] <[log in to unmask]>:
> >> The relationship between the soled and the dener is just the
> >> standard medieval one between solidus (French sou) et
> >> denarius (French denier). It was decimalized during the
> >> XIXth century for the same reasons as other currencies :
> >> convenience.
> >
> >But why was it decimalised to 1:100 rather than 1:10?
> >
> >Too cumbersome. 
> 
> Well, even if it were too cumbersome to work long-term with a 1:10 ratio,
> I'd except them to decimalise to 1:10 introduce either a tenth of a denier
> coin or a ten solidus coin to get the 1:100 ratio, and then perhaps in time
> the middle unit would fall out of use (just as happened with the French, as
> you point out).  
> 
> Can you point out any comparable case in our timeline, of 1:12 getting
> decimalised to 1:100?
> 
> Also, how do you envision decimalisation took place?  What were the old
> pre-decimal coins worth afterwards, if they were still legal tender at all?
> 
> Alex