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Mark Reed wrote:
didn't have a clue
> he was a Brit until he
> >> said "Sen Thomas" instead of "Saint
> Thomas". That was an instant
> >> giveaway that he was a Brit. I was shocked that
> with an American
> >> accent so perfect he could make an error so
> fundamental.
> >
> No, it's a pronunciation.  He pronounced "St.
> Thomas" as  something
> like [sEn] Thomas, where an American would say something
> like [sejn?] Thomas.  "Saint" in names (even when abbreviated
> "St.") is always pronounced the same as the word "saint".

I've never actually heard it as [sEn], but in my exposure to fancy Eastern (US) educational institutions, where Anglophilia is/was rampant, we often reduced "saint" to [s@n] or [s@n?]. But most Murkins say [sejnt] one way or another..........
> 
> Which is why I had no idea, back when watching the 80's
> TV show
> "Airwolf", that Stringfellow Hawk's brother
> [sInjIn] was actually
> named "St. John" .

Definitely a Britishism. I've heard it, but never from an American unless he/she was terminally infected with Anglophilia-- then more like ['sIndZ@n].  It is, however, the usual pronunciation (in literary circles) of the name of French poet St.John Perse ['sIndZ@n'p@r\s] NB not [pERs]!!